Umm Sulaim's Thoughts

Thoughts Lead To Appreciation

NIQAB: Rebuttal Of Opposition

Hostility to the Niqab has once again burst, this time in the United Kingdom.

In this publication, this author’s refutation utilized in similar experiences in Sokoto, Northern Nigeria is presented.

1 NIQAB: Rebuttal Of Opposition

a) It could be used in a crime and no one would know who did it.

That was very good coming from a people known for not penalizing their own people for crimes.

In any offence committed by a team of persons of Hausa-Fulani and non-Hausa-Fulani ethnicities, the names of the former automatically disappears from the list of accused persons.

Only non-indigenes will be compelled to face the consequence of the offence.

b) It is necessary for identification.

Yet, Hausa-Fulanis identify me everywhere I go in Sokoto and even when they come across me in other states.

One wonders how they accomplish that feat without seeing my face.

Apparently, they can activate and deactivate their capacity to identify me.

They recognize me – and even mention my name – when they are not in a position of authority over me.

However, the Hausa-Fulani promptly dispense with that capacity as soon as they are in a position of authority.

c) It is important to observe facial expressions to know the person’s intention.

Splendid, considering pretension is a cultural garb of the Hausa-Fulani.

Nothing positive is real.

What happens in one’s presence is very different from events behind one’s back.

Even Islam is not respected in the deception games.

Everything Islam is a pawn.

They claim to hate Christians for not being Muslims.

In contradiction, they hate Muslims of other ethnicities for not conforming to Hausa-Fulani culture.

They greet As-Salam alaykum to make the addressed feel comfortable and follow the greeting of peace with insults.

d) It is extremism.

Promptly, remind them that should make female Companions of the Messenger of Allah – plus Allah, His Messenger, the Sahaba (Companions) – extremists.

Immediately, they are silenced.

Hausa-Fulani are trained to be so against Islam they naturally oppose Islam without realising they shoot self in the mouth each time.

Umm Sulaim’s Thoughts AT ONE: Zainab

e) This is Hausa land. You must conform to our culture.

However, on television, they say: This is a Muslim region. This is an Islamic environment.

HYPOCRITES.

Very similar to this hypocrisy is the west who champion human freedoms but hinder same when they so choose.

f) Dress same as our girls.

They mean I should wear a long Hijab that reaches my ankles one day and the next, wear tight jeans or bottom-hugging skirt with a scarf, the same type of scarf that is traditional to many African communities.

In addition, a woman must remove her Niqab in class, even in the Islamic department!

The lecturer is her mahram (family), they say!!!

g) You see our face. We should see yours.

Who asked them to show me their face? Why are they deluded I want to see their face?

The only persons whose face I wish to see are those of well-wishers and compatible persons, and that excludes them.

h) If you travel to America dressed like that you will be arrested.

Hausa-Fulanis are doing a great job harassing me. Why should I worry about Americans?

i) France has banned the Niqab.

France must have taken the cue from the Hausa-Fulani who banned the Niqab decades earlier.

Interestingly, France is a secular nation. Northern Nigeria insist on being called the Muslim North.

Moreover, a people who claim allegiance to Islam use non-Muslims, secularists and Islamophobes to authenticate own discriminatory practices.

j) Your Niqab is not attractive. You are a ghost.

People delude self they alone have perceptions of others.

In spite of the mouths of the Hausa-Fulani, I have reserved the following remarks for seven years for some reasons.

However, as the debate over the Niqab rages, I present them:

If you know what I think of your face you will hate yourself.

The Fulani resembles excreta, the dark-skinned Fulani as Benin or Ife sculpture, a creature carved in stone and the Hausa as rats.

Anyone who takes issue with what a Muslim woman looks like in a Niqab should ask self what one resembles.

One thread connects all Muslims who oppose the Niqab: resentment to individual freedom.

That is a general feature of the average Muslim, a feature which covers a significant theme of publications on Umm Sulaim’s Thoughts.

These Muslims must direct the life of others and feel that their own lifestyle should be the standard for other Muslims.

What they failed to accomplish, every other Muslim should be prevented from achieving.

Their personal decisions must be imposed on other Muslims.

The absurdity of the anti-Niqab movement among Muslims is this:

The woman in a Niqab is expected to remove the Niqab under conditions of compulsion. Muslims in the community create and sustain conditions of compulsion.

Advertisements

13 comments on “NIQAB: Rebuttal Of Opposition

  1. ashantininja
    September 19, 2013

    SubhanAllah. I didn’t know the Niqab was banned in the northern regions.

    • Umm Sulaim
      September 19, 2013

      My dear, it is.

      According to the Hausa-Fulani, the Niqab is unacceptable in their culture.

      The one and only,

      Umm Sulaim

      • ashantininja
        September 20, 2013

        SubhanAllah. I have a friend who is Hausa but I didn’t know that. I thought they are quite strict in some things although they have a strange courting system which is not very Islamic. My friend who wants to get married can’t talk to her father about it and she would have to find her own spouse.

        • Umm Sulaim
          September 20, 2013

          My dear, the strictness is only in matters of their culture.

          Obviously, in reference to your friend, a huge parent-child gap exists in their relationships.

          Finding a spouse is not so much the issue, but the associated pretence – promiscuity and everyone pretends it is not happening.

          And after marriage, the man is encouraged to sleep with anything he finds in a skirt.

          Married women sometimes join in the game.

          The one and only,

          Umm Sulaim

          • ashantininja
            September 20, 2013

            Allahu musta’3n. This is terrible. Can I ask what is your tribe/ cultural background please ukhti?

            • Umm Sulaim
              September 20, 2013

              My dear, I am Igbo.

              I have lived among different communities, including an 11-year residency in Lagos.

              I still regard Lagos as my city.

              The one and only,

              Umm Sulaim

              • ashantininja
                September 20, 2013

                MashaAllah, so how is niqabi seen in your community?

                • Umm Sulaim
                  September 20, 2013

                  My people Ndi Igbo are predominantly non-Muslims and have no business with Allah, His Messenger, the Qur’an and the Sunnah and hence no obligation towards the Niqab.

                  The one and only,

                  Umm Sulaim

                  • ashantininja
                    September 20, 2013

                    Yes I understand. But do they show any kind of hostility towards it and is it difficult for a Muslim woman to be accepted wearing it? I had a neighbor who was of the delta tribe and when I started wearing it she told me that where she come from its prostitutes who dress like that.

                    • Umm Sulaim
                      September 20, 2013

                      I doubt prostitutes dress as that in the South.

                      In the North, yes, some do.

                      It is more likely the Hijab and Niqab will be brought by the man who patronises the prostitutes for her to wear to misrepresent herself as a decent woman – part of the pretence I mentioned earlier.

                      My people resident in my region are not accustomed to the Niqab and respond the same way as they do to any other form of unfamiliar dress.

                      Elsewhere in the South, my people respond depending on own attitude.

                      The trouble-makers may insult the woman. Others will mind own business and reserve comment.

                      It is in the North that I have experienced overt hostility from some of my people.

                      This is ironic considering this is supposed to be the Muslim North where Christians are oppressed.

                      It demonstrates anyone who fights the cultural battles of the Hausa-Fulani is welcome.

                      Wearing a Niqab is most difficult in the North.

                      The one and only,

                      Umm Sulaim

                    • ashantininja
                      September 20, 2013

                      SubhanAllah. JazakAllah khair for the information.

                    • Umm Sulaim
                      September 20, 2013

                      My pleasure.

                      The one and only,

                      Umm Sulaim

  2. Pingback: STILL STATE SECURITY SERVICE ~SSS II | Umm Sulaim's Thoughts

Your Thoughts

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Information

This entry was posted on September 18, 2013 by in Identity, Thoughts, Women and tagged , , , , , , , , , , .

Copyright

© Umm Sulaim’s Thoughts 1438/ 2017. All rights reserved.

Express Your Thoughts

Discussions And Concerns

Donations

**Support my writings on religious freedom, women’s liberty and children’s rights by donating on PayPal to sulaim[dot]umm[at]gmail[dot]com**

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Enjoy The Thoughts

%d bloggers like this: